Measuring Project Success

There are many different ways to measure the success of a project, and as it turns out, some are a bit easier to manage than others. You will definitely look more credible if you come to the table talking about measurement, so ask yourself these questions to help create an effective measurement plan.

The Art of Interrupting

Your role as a project manager is to keep everyone on task in meetings and just in general as you move toward your goals. So it should actually be expected that you will need to (politely) interrupt people from time to time. Read on to see tips on how you can master the art of interrupting!

Adjusting Your Working Style for Different Stakeholders

One of the best skills you can have as a professional is to be able to adjust your working style to enhance the interactions you have with others. Check out some questions you should be asking about yourself and your team to optimize everyone’s style.

Developing a Change Management Plan

One of the main premises of change management is the idea that people like to have control over their own situations. When implementing large-scale projects, change targets have a perceived (or real) loss of control. Here are some tips on how to manage change effectively so that targets adopt the change.

The Project Sponsor

The project sponsor is one of the most important stakeholders you will have on any given project. If you do not have a leader talking the talk and really walking the walk – outwardly supporting the change, its goals, its potential outcomes, new processes and systems, etc. – people will not get on board.

(Re)Organizing Project Management Processes and Tools

The start of a new year is a good time to think about what project management processes and tools you have in place for each of your projects, and whether you need to start, stop, continue, and/or tweak them to ensure that 2016 is as efficient and effective as it can be. Read on to see how you should plan this important team pulse check!

Facilitating a Lessons Learned Session

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A lessons learned session is a must-do at the end of most projects. There is really nothing better than voicing the good, the bad, and the ugly about a given project for everyone to hear, acknowledge, understand, and take action on. Otherwise, innovations and successes will be forgotten and mistakes will be repeated.